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military service to build the america we know today. they took their skill, dedication, courage and faithful service and made our nation strong. help us to honor and dedicate our service to them; for, they are our american veterans. amen. >>now, i would like to invite ms. tammy duckworth, an army veteran and assistant secretary at the department of veterans affairs to lead as in the pledge of allegiance. >> present, arms. arms. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and it to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. >> please be seated. it is now my distinct privilege to introduce the leaders of the national veterans service organizations that comprise the veterans day national committee. the committee was formed by presidential order in 1954 to hold this annual observance in honor of america's veterans and to encourage and support veterans day observances throughout the nation. please hold your applause until i have introduced the special guests. if you are able, please stand when i call
people, we will ensure that america's legacy is a commitment, unwavering commitment to compassionate care for its 23 million veterans. from lexington and concord to antietam and dennis bygettysbur, kaisan, to fallujah, and afghanistan, and countless other places, the warriors we honor today have earned it the love, the respect and the admiration of a grateful nation. our guest today leads our efforts to honor veterans with great passion and resolved. and i know that firsthand. there is no stronger advocate for those who serve in uniform today for have served our nation in years past. ladies and gentlemen, it is with great personal pleasure and professional pride that i present to our commander in chief, the president of the united states of america. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you so much. please be seated. thank you, secretary shinseki, for the generous introduction. more importantly, the extraordinary bravery with which you served as both on and off the battlefield. i want to thank our standing vice-president, joe biden and his wonderful wife for being here today. we want
stretched america's frontiers to the pacific ocean. back to the battle of trenton for a moment. as i said, monroe didn't cross the delaware on the same boat as washington. he crossed earlier with a squad that landed on the jersey shore to the north of trenton and circled behind the town while washington landed with his troops on the riverside below the town. now what makes trenton so important is that the british had almost won the war by christmas of 1776. their troops had overrun on the island, new york, westchester and most of new jersey. thousands of american troops had deserted and the british had chased the remnants of washington's army across new jersey over the delaware and in to pennsylvania. white coats were in sight of the american capital. congress had fled to baltimore and began debating terms of could the chelation -- capitulation. unless washington could come up with a miracle, and he chose a young college student, lieutenant james monroe, to help me cut miracle happen. they all crossed the delaware during a blinding snowstorm on christmas night only six months after we had
here streaming live. in america, we understand that town hall events folks come from all over and have a free flowing exchange of ideas and questions with whomever is on stage. this is probably better to be called political theater in the round. a bit of she a she at theatric. the white house has a bit of politte theater on its own and tried to side step rigid chinese control of the questions and put out subtly that questions could be submitted to the u.s. embassy website and a good number of questions have been collected there and will be given to the president in addition to those he will get from the audience. they hope those questions have a bit mor spontaneity. this will all be conducted in one of the various chinese diia electric. we ex--- dialect. we expect most to be conducted in edge. >>> there was quite a bit of drama leading up to the event. major negotiating between the white house and it the chinese government over pretty much every detail of what is about to unfold, right? >> that's right. i mean let's go back to the original chinese invitation to president obama to come
google. innovation has always been on my mind. i've assumed this was an area where america remained head and shoulders above the world. that's where our future lies, how we'll move up the value chain and reuate new jobs for the future. over the last few months i've been having second thoughts. i've been reading these new studies that use not polls of experts but hard data and they suggest that america's lead is slipping. in fact, one of them looks at the degree to which countries are adjusting and improving their research technology and regulatory policies to stay competitive. and it finds that the united states has made the least progress of the 36 nations in four regions studied. you can go to our website for the actual studies. consider the three most important technologies in alternative energy that are likely to yield big payoffs -- solar, wind and battery power. america doesn't measure up to asia in any of the three. take solar energy. japan and china each have three of the top ten companies in that field. america has only two. let's be clear. america still dominates the world of i
of knnovell before he took on google. i've assumed this was an area where america remained head and shoulders above the world. that's where our future lies, how we'll create new jobs for the future. over the last few months i've been having second thoughts. i've been reading these new studies that use not polls of experts but hard data and they suggest that america's lead is slipping. in fact, one with of them looks at the degree to which countries are adjusting and improving their research technology and regulatory policies to stay competitive. and it finds that the united states has made the least progress of the 36 nations in four regions studied. you can go to our website for the actual studies. consider the three most important technologies in alternative energy that are likely to yield big payoffs -- solar, wind and battery power. america doesn't measure up to asia in any of the three. take solar energy. japan and china each have three of the top ten companies in that field. america has only two. let's be clear. america still dominates the world of innovation by any measure, but the res
. we are deciding whether we are going to create jobs here in america or we're going to send those jobs overseas. and we're certainly deciding whether we are going to have a stronger energy independent america or a weaker oil-addicted america. i think the choice is clear. the challenge before us is one of political will. because americans already know how to do what this bill sets the framework for, we know how to transition to clean energy, how to reduce pollution, how to grow our economy. in my home state of oregon, with a 25% renewable energy standard by 2025, the guarantee of that market, clean energy jobs are growing seven times faster than jobs in the oregon economy as a whole. we have had three solar manufacturers move to the state in the last couple of years. we have communities in rural oregon that are producing partnerships to create jobs in the woods again, to thin the force, to return the forest health, and, in the process, reduce renewable energy from biomass. despite the recession that we currently are in, our economy is 16% larger than it was in 2005. yet, the missions si
world news", broadcast our viewers on pbs in america and also on the globe. coming up later for you, recession and is meet the workers free training for the new job market. >> my husband and i decided to look at it like this is an opportunity. when in your life do you get to really choose what career path you are following? >> and standing up to the godfather. the island of sicily launch as anti-mafia package holidays. hello to you. he will go briefly to the copenhagen climate summit, and today, president obama announced the commitments on greenhouse gases he will take with them. he has pledged to cut american carbon emissions by about 17% by 2020. it reverses the policy of the bush administration and in the current state of u.s. politics, it is risky, but is it enough to rescue a meaningful agreement when world leaders meet next month? >> some performances are common to ever president, like freeing a turkey just before the thanksgiving feast. >> you know, there are certain days that remind me of why i ran for this office, and then there are moments like this -- new [laughter] where
stoy, we take you to dided town on the west ba where america settlers say they feel under attack. thpalestinians say they are rced to do witut. >>> and throughout europe toda the talk is all about the world p and a missed ca that h ance celebring and ireland outrag. and the peter g. pet >> from the world's leadg reports and analysts, here's at's happening from around t world. this is orldfocus." major supporhas been provided by rosalind p. walter and the peter g.eterson foundation, dicated to promoting fiscalesponsibility and addressing keyconomic chalnges facing america's future. and addition funding is ovided by the following supporters -- >>> hello and od evening. i'm dalj dhaliwal in new york. presidt obama had a tough new message today foroth north korea and iran, tling them to sce back their nuclear programsr face the consuences. the present made his remarks in south korea, the last stopon his week-long ip to asia. once again, he sa things could improve for north korea and iran if they act. tonight's le focus,eook at what the president had to say, folwed by analysiof his la
children's future? america, if you believe this country is great, but you're not really into that one world government thing, watch out! because the masks are coming off. stand up, follow me! hello, america. if you missed last night's show, go back on-line and watch it or d.v.r. it every day. we showed you people with clear influence around the white house who want to transform this country into something revoluntionary, are almost venezuelan in nature, completely different than what our founders intended. they want to turn us into a country that focuses more on spreading the wealth than actually creating it, a place where success is punished, mediocrity is encouraged. everybody will get a trophy, in favor of a nanny state that just knows better than you do. i can't help but think that we are rat a crossroads. maybe the white house will call me on that statement. did i get that one wrong? i don't think we did. we're at a crossroads. we have to choose. do you want to turn back towards our founders and more freedoms, more personal liberty, and more personal responsibility and ak accountabilit
and support her. the other aspect is that she could have pivoted to why politics in america is so broken. what people are so intense and angry and divided that we cannot have a civil to vacation anymore. >sean: are read the book. the stories where she tells about her father. it takes her hunting, they kill amos before she goes to school. the father takes out the warm eyeballs of the moose. i'm thinking, most people purchase their package to meet so they don't understand the reality of where our meat comes from. alaska, is if she is more real than people who are "trained, sophisticated." >> that stupid television show of real lives of housewives, that is not real. that is not real. she is real. she has to set the context. >> here is the big question, do you ever want to be president of the united states? >> that is not on my radar screen right now. when you consider some of the ordinary turning into extraordinary things in my life, i am not want to predict what will happen in a few years. my ambition, my desire is to help our country in whatever role that may be. i cannot predict what that will
. this is a national security issue what is gue best for the united states of america. my understanding is senator jim web from virginia has come out and said this isn't a good idea. none the less i do agree. it's important to put politics aside and focus on what is best for the national security of our country. >> you say you don't believe of the three alternatives you cite either no trial or detention military commission or trial in the civil federal courts in the united states why is this inappropriate when so many people suggest isn't this exactly where it should be held the mayor of the city michael bloomberg who i guess is technically a republican his police commissioner ray kelly tough as nails ex-marine they both say it is appropriate to have it here. the city can handle it and why not? >> i agree the city can probably handle it better than any other city in the world quite frankly. but as to whether or not this is the appropriate place, i think you have to look at a number of factors. for example the level of security that will be required to have this kinds of trial in the middle of new york
of the american people. sean: or live to tape? >> i would have done it in front of all of america there. she was drawing, 20000, 30,000, 50,000 to hear her speak. why not do the interview in front of those people? sean: that's not a bad idea. there are ways mediawise that people can handle an environment that is predictably hostile. look, i like the governor. i voted for the governor. i've been out on the campaign trail with her. she's a rock store. and she -- if she decides to get in in 2012, she will be a formidable candidate. >> but there are times when her language, when the words that she chooses, i know you got some clips here, there are times when the words she chooses could have been better. there are times when she says things because she is so real, that she will say things that are not as effective as they could have been. sean: but all right. let's say franklin starts advising her -- frank luntz starts advising her. do you want her to be a plastic, contrived, rehearsed -- i'll give you an example. we do our great american panel every night. we tell people what the topics are. he
jobs. >> it will be a long bone night. ings are joining us. the deadline for closing america's hugely controversial prison -- prison in guantanamo bay just two months from now will not be met. he confirmed the commitment he made so publicly when it came to office will not be filled in time. heaid he was confident, though, it will be closed sometime next year but technical and political problems would take longer to resolve. here is a special report for us from the military base. >> it is the early morning call to prayer. we cheered takes place behind razor wire. it is guantanamo, where america has been holding detainees or terrorist suspects for almost eight years. it is the start of yet another day at one of the world's most the tories detention facilities and yet no end in sight. the kind of the watch towers and heavily guarded security fences, it is business as usual. the president's deadline to close the camp down has slipped but here there is not that much of a supplies. in fact, at one of the camp, construction workers are still making improvements. no sign of demolition yet. an
now public. a memo from america's ambassador to kabul. carl iken barry warns the president not to send more troops without progress by the afghan government in handling corruption, more proof that the president's advisors are split. >> his cabinet is divided. it's taken him a long time to come to this decision and tchaurg time the war -- democrats and those on the left. >> it's a complex decision for the president, whose been getting conflicting advice. on the one side are the skeptics, those not yet convinced more troops should be sent as well as ambassador iken barry, they include joe biden and the president's chief of staff robert emanuel. on the other side those led by general mccrystal, the defense secretary robert gates and hillary clinton are also on his side. one issue around which they all unite, president karzai must change. >> i think that the corruption issue really goes to the heart of whether the people of afghanistan feel that the government is on their side, is working for them. >> the president thereof make that decision sooner rather than later. the longer he leaves i
are the same or worse than in america. >> reporter: you say this is a fight parents should pick with their children. pediatricians say pick your battles with their children. >> yes. i think a lot of parents by the time the kids are 15, 16 years old are picking the battles carefully. this have a fight worth picking. and what i tell parents is, i know you don't want to raise issues that aren't going to go anywhere but this is worth raising. my favorite time to talk to a kid is when you are driving in the car, eyes are forward and you have them stuck in the car. they are not going anywhere. >> the captive audience. it is an important message and one that janet says don't wait until they are 15 or 16 to say. have it sooner. we have a link to their website at our website at wusa9.com. >>> let's go to howard for an update on what is happening with ida. >> ida is falling apart. it looks like it is falling apart in the sense that down here looks better. out of cancun it was a category two storm and had symmetry. but some dry air is wrapped in and here is where you find the precipitation
is about. we're gointoo around the world to see what ssons we can learn fix america's sick, sick health care system. i' covered the world as a foreign correspondent, andight now i'm writing a book abo health carsystems seas. firsst on my tour is great britain, wre our family lived for five years even thougthe uk is our closest ropean ally, its alth ce solution that is, the vernment-run national health service-- may seem to close to soclism for most aman still, we can len something here. for about half of what we pa per person, the nhcovers everybodand s mewh tter health isti, longer lifexptancower iant mortaly. britain's national healt servicis dicatedo the oposition that you should never have to pay medical bill. the nhs, there's no insuran premium,o co-pay, fee at l. the system covers evybody. and, you kno when we lived here, my family got really gd care from the nhs, althoh we often had to wait to see doctor. and yet thwspars here are full of nhrrortories-- raoning, waiting lists, terrible mistake so i've come to london to e th nhs. is it an answer for the u., or just some horrle so
, there is no group in america, probably not even the jews themselves, which cites more passionately with israel and the war being waged against it by the arab muslim world and which is more steadfast in upholding israel's right to defend itself against its sworn enemies than the so-called religious right. yet instead of forging the pluto alliance for this community, jewish liberals look for ways to justify their refusal to do so. at the same time, perfectly willing to make common cause for the so-called mainline protestant denominations despite the fact that unfriendliness and even outright hostility to israel have become pervasive in that sector of the christian world. a similar situation exists in the strictly political realm here although poll data show self-described conservatives and self-described republicans sympathizing with israel in much greater proportions than liberals self-described liberals that is, and self-described democrats. for example, in a pew survey taken early this year, 60 percent of conservatives sided with israel against a person with the palestinians. whereas a compar
just out in paper back guilty liberal victims and their assault on america. great stuff on sarah palin i will be referencing later. -- the partisan divide how this is automatically reflex democrats against republicans. isn't it an issue where politicians staked out their turf with little regard for the facts? >> i am glad you asked me that. there were things like that where democrats worried about poor security. some democrats on our side this argument we are at war. the democrats want to treater wrists like they are defendants and saying no it's a war. it's an argument when the cases were going to the supreme court. even when he was captured on american soil no it should be a military tribunal. >> have they moved into any suburban neighborhoods opened up shops in any malls? have they raped or murdered anybody? >> the main problem isn't security. >> the main problem is in the head. >> the main problem is not security as you seem to think. although your arguments we can handle it, we can hand tell. new york city handled 9-11 honorably and heroically. it's not that you want another 9-11
afghanistan and pakistan. it's conducted from thousands of miles away in suburban america. >> reporter: look around this room. it's been hit by a missile fired from an unmanned aerial vehicle, a uav, more commonly known as a drone. the family living here say children were killed in this u.s. attack. the children were never the target, but in pakistan's tribal border region, the death spelled trouble for u.s. foreign policy. where many believe that fighting with drones is cowardly. >> last year, one of the most popular songs in pakistani pop culture was a song whose lyrics talked about how america fights without honor. >> reporter: launched from just over the border in afghanistan, the pilotless predator and reaper drones are the answer to so many of the u.s. military's problems. credited with killing more than a dozen al qaeda leaders. >> the real advantage of unmanned aerial systems is they allow you to project power without projecting vulnerability. >> reporter: this is what the view looks like from a drone. and this is how effective they can be. those men on the corner are firing guns. th
want you to listen. >> we liberated more than 25 million afghans. now america and our 25 nato allies and 17 partner nations are standing with the afghan people as they defend their free society. the enemy is determined. the terrain is harsh and the battle is difficult, but our coalition will stay in this fight. we will not let the taliban or al qaeda return to power, and afghanistan will never again be a safe haven for terrorists. >> president bush acknowledged then that the incoming administration faced a volatile situations in several hot spots, especially along afghanistan's border with pakistan. well, for more than 20 years he endured a private hell. doctors thought he was in a coma, but he was cautioonscious along unable to speak and now he tells cnn about his nightmare. as seven suspects are charged with a terror incident in mumbai, last year's terror attacks could have been worse. meet one man who might have served thousands of train travelers that day. >>> and is it a bird or a plane? well, no, some say it's a rocket man trying to do what no other man trying to do what no oth
of the contract with america and the flat tax. she remained -- he approaches any subjects as internet, a government in general with one statement -- freedom of works. please welcome, dick armey. [applause] >> let me introduce somebody that every time i hear the name, dick armey's ideological soul mate. arianna huffington -- [laughter] is a nationally syndicated columnist and author of 12 books. she is co-host of "left, right and center," in may, 2005, she launched a news again blog site that has quickly become not only one of the most widely read and the most influential in the media and in political circles. in 2006, time magazine put her on the list of the time 100, their list of the world's most influential leaders. in 2009, she was named one of the most influential women and media by forbes. cordially from greece, huffington moved to england and graduated from cambridge with a master's in economics. she is known for her bold and fearlessness and believes in saying what needs to be said in doing what needs to be done, to leave and succeed. she is a prolific author with titles inclu
is on the rise in america. a stunning new report says 49 million people in this country including 17 million children have trouble getting enough food last year. i'll speak with the agriculture secretary, tom vilsack. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this week hearings and investigations began into the massacre of 13 soldiers at ft. hood, texas. the number one question, why didn't anyone in charge see it coming? i spoke about that with congressman pete hoekstra, he's the ranking member of the house intelligence committee. congressman, thanks very much for coming in. i know you're getting ready to catch a flight. are you satisfied with the answers you're getting so far from the executive branch of the u.s. government whether the pentagon or the administration, the army, as far as this investigation is concerned? >> no, wolf, i'm really not. and i think i probably share some of the same frustrations that senator lieberman has. i applaud the senate for holding public hearings. i hold them -- i applaud
's a quote from the story. in a few short decades, america underwent, i think, a fantastic transformation in politics, society and the culture. and i think most people wanted what had happened and who were they at the end of this period. in the decades following the revolution. before the revolution, america had been a collection of british colonies composed of some 2 million subjects, hobbled along the atlantic coast 3000 miles from the centers of civilization. european outpost so to speak whose cultural focus was still not the metropolitan center of the empire. by 1815, following the second war with great britain which is often referred to as a second war of independence independence, these insignificant problems had become a single giant, in a republic with nearly 10 million citizens, many of whom had already spilled over the appellations into the western territories. a cultural focus of this new, huge expansive nation was no longer a broad. it was instead directed inward at its own boundless possibilities. americans knew they were grand experiment of democracy, but they were competent
are going to vote on a bill which to me the people of america don't like. and you know who doesn't like it the most? seniors. you know why? they're concerned. they know medicare is being -- is going broke, and by the year 017, there will be $500 billion of cuts in medicare. and yet, the money that's being cut from medicare isn't being used to save medicare. it's to start a whole new program that's going to cause americans who have insurance to pay more. it's going to cause people that don't have any insurance to make it harder to get, or if they go to an emergency room, have to pay more, that bill is going to be higher. all because of what i believe is an irresponsible piece of legislation that is going to be a huge weight on our american economy at a time when you have 10.2% unemployment. but i see the senator from nevada has -- he has a similar copy of the bills next to him and he may want to chime in on what he is seeing in his home state and what he is hearing from people who live in nevada and the small businesses as well as the hospitals and providers. mr. ensign: if the senator w
what lessons we can learn to fix america's sick, sick health care system. i've covered the world as a foreign correspondent, and right now i'm writing a book about health care systems overseas. first stop on my tour is great britain, where our family lived for five years. even though the uk is our closest european ally, its health care solution that is, the government-run national health service-- may seem too close to socialism for most americans. still, we can learn something here. for about half of what we pay per person, the nhs covers everybody and has somewhat better health statistics, longer life expectancy, lower infant mortality. britain's national health service is dedicated to the proposition that you should never have to pay a medical bill. in the nhs, there's no insurance premium, no co-pay, no fee at all. the system covers everybody. and, you know, when we lived here, my family got really good care from the nhs, although we often had to wait to see a doctor. and yet the newspapers here are full of nhs horror stories-- rationing, waiting lists, terrible mistakes. so
as a public service by america's cable companies. coming up this thanksgiving day, director steven spielberg received the liberty medal at the national constitution center. then, remarks from the former undersecretary of defense, paul wolfowitz on the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall. after that, political strategists assess the new obama administration as he nears his first year in office. friday, for the first time in british history, parliament opens its chambers to non-mp's as they debate in the house of commons. former new york times reporter at what has to his plagiarism. a look back to the cuban missile crisis, as well. also, have world threats been over-the post cold war world. sunday, two programs on democracy and the internet, including the university of virginia powell on how the political process has been affected by the internet. the facebook founder will talk about how networking is changing the political process. this holiday weekend on c-span. >> thanksgiving week and on c- span, american icons, three nights of cspan original documentaries on the iconic homes o
is the big drag on bank of america merrill lynch call. take a look, really ruffled the chips today. basically the outlook for demand for inventory they say is going to get weak here looking out into the fourth quarter and into next year. so that's their call. and that's what's really brought down the tech today. if we can take a look at our board of the stocks that are bucking the trend today. netapp is one of them after posting better than expected earnings. it is too the upside. one of the few within the nasdaq 100. directv turning positive this afternoon as liberty media shareholders approve a reorganization that's going to give it more autonomy. let's move on down to the nymex now and sharon epperson. >> bertha, it looks like risk appetite has subsided a bit today at least when it comes to investors being interested in energy in the commodities complex. oil prices fell nearly $2 today. the december contract below $78 a barrel. january right around $78 a barrel. keep in mind we are going to have the exploration of the december futures contract tomorrow. so january is where most of the volu
states of america. their legacy will be an america that is safer and stronger. an america that reflects the extraordinary character of the men and women who serve it. thank you. >> good morning. this is congressman mark kirk of illinois. when i returned home from active duty in afghanistan, i dedicated my congressional service to helping families with healthcare. we can lower healthcare costs and provide conference for americans who lack insurance by enabouting key reforms that already help thousands of families in many states. first, we can start lowering costs by reigning in lawsuits in america. we are the most litigious country on earth. lawsuit reforms can save billions in healthcare costs alone. in new jersey, without lawsuit reform, it costs $5,500 per patient to provide insurance. in california, with some of the strongest lawsuit reforms, insurance costs half as much as it does in new jersey. congress should enhance the effective reforms of many states by enacting lawsuit reforms for our entire country. second, congress should grant the right of each american to buy coverage from
responsibility and addressingey economic challeng facing america's future. and additional funding is providedy the following pporters -- >>> hello d good evening. m daljit dhaliwal. in theinternational chessame of iran's nuclear program, it was x world wers that ma a movetoday. delegas from the united states, britain, france, germany, russia and china met in brussels,belgium, and turned up the heat on iran. they didn't discuss e sanctions, not y anyway, but that posbility served as a backdropor today's meetings. the issue is iran's nuclear ambitions. tehranays its uranium enrichment programs for peaceful purposes only, but other untries worry gives iran the capability of making an atic bomb. despite some timism in recent wes, iran now seems to be rejeing a plan have its uranm enriched outside the country. e delegates in brussels urd iran to reonsider, a hence thtalk by president oma and othe this weekbout the possibility new sanctions. what kind of measuresnd when, that is our "lead focus" tonight. weeks after andisclosed the existence of this once secret nuclear facility nea the holy city
general motors and chrysler? governments don't own big companies in america. what ruptured? what ruptured is the concern that there is way too much in spending and to be fair, it's not the president's fault. but when you say -- and the combined the billions of dollars, there is one huge massive spending and as a stimulus package. . >> what happens is the republican party has a lot of troubles. we put on the brakes and send a missile. that was to park. -- that was too far. many private people said there will be a bill and we're better off negotiating in good faith because there is going to be a bill. what is going to happen is this possibility, which is the a.m .a is there because they thought they would get a deal. if it does not get fixed, i do not know where they will be. hospitals are there because they said they would have 9066%6% coverage. >> why do you think the industry support did not translate into republicans support? >> we're down to 170 boats. at 177 votes, the sport gentleman in new orleans. ok, we could lose that seat. at 177 seats, there are not a lot of seats you can lose.
dedicated funding to cover all of new york city's added security costs? >> i think that is fair. america was attack on september the 11th. that was of national consequence. although the trial will be hosted in new york, it seems to me that new york should not bear the burden alone. this is a national -- >> so you will recommend, and i presume, fight for these funds from omb which we know sometimes has other things on its mind. >> with your help -- >> you have my full and undivided help. i just don't want mayor bloomberg, the commissioner. they didn't make the decision, but they stepped up to the plate and willingly agreed. i don't think either they or new york city, new york state should be left hanging out there paying any of the costs of this, and i take it you fully agree with that. >> i don't disagree with that at all. >> okay. second question, and just one other thing on this. there may be other costs that we can't envision, and i take it we're wanot going to find someby saying this wasn't in an original application or on an original request. i take it there will be flexibility and
minister of great britain, gordon brown and the secretary of state of the united states of america, hillary clinton, the president of the republic ofçó france, nicolas sarkozy, the chancellor of the federal republic of germany, angela merkel. the president of germany. medvedev, the russian president. the vice chancellor to have federal republic of germany and heads of state of government from all over europe. welcome to berlin. >> this is where the walls stood. today we commemorate the many people who died at the wall. every single victim has a special place in our hearts. when the wall came down on november 9, 1989, berlin cried tears of joy. people were dancing on top of the wall. since then a place of horror has become a place of freedom. tonight, we are celebrating a major festival of freedom. together we will watch it is a dominos are toppled. a big word of thanks to the more than 15,000 predominantly young people from around the world who have imstraited these dominos. each stone expresses a yearning for peace. quite a special dom annoy has reached us from -- domino has reached us f
and govern america from the left is failing quickly and decisively. bill crystal says our task is to minimize the damage and use the next three years to lay the ground work intelligently for a new era that can conserve prosperity and revitalize pennsylvania from the republican line. sit worth the price? >> no. i come to the point where i don't even feel that way as a republican. i think look what happened here with hasan and the response of our media and that attack at fort hood and look at that and also the way that we are looking at things internally, you know we have the chief of the staff in t$e army saying after somebody slaughtered all t$ese people diversity is your greatest string and then you go to this diverse place. tribal and ethnic diversity in afghanistan and iraq and you see that, that's really not a string strength in reality. diversity of this all over the world is endless strife and bloodshed and we're not - our democracy was born out of anglo-saxon civilization. and with democracy it's really a simple thing really. so i don't know why we have to point a bayon et to make the
and the horse and buggies early in the morning. >> i got out and saw america too. >> what did you see? >> i walked from the upper west side to the upper east side. kind of crazy over there. >> did you? i didn't even get that far. >> took kate ice skating. it was a lot of fun. i saw all sides of america. >> i'm sure you did. it is good to be back. >> have you ever been over to the east side? >> no. what's it like? >> it's a strange land. >> it is. >> it's a strange, strange land. >> we have an interesting panel this morning. willie is here. chrystia is back there pimping. >> and also stephen a. smith in philadelphia is with us. we're going to be talking about this tiger story. i have to say, willie, leave him alone. he has all these endorsements. it's important. there's nothing on the sleeve of golf balls that says, if you buy these golf balls, you get to figure out what's going on with tiger's life. >> the story is a bit suspicious. he's the most marketable athlete in the world. what does that mean for him? think about kobe bryant. he allegedly did something worse than this. >> he was frame
. >> side by side, america's president and china's, the superpower that is rising. ♪ their autonomies intertwined. the world's major challenges can only be tackled if they work together. these nations the biggest emitters of greenhouse cases spoke about a climate change deal reducing carbon emissions. >> much still separates them. president obama is easy with free press. china is not. no questis were allowed. >> it is not a partial report or political declaration but a report that covers all of the issues in negotiations and one that has immediate operational effect. >> he raised a sensitive subject. >> while we recognize that tibet is part of the people's republic of china, the united states supports an early resumption of dialogue between the chinese government and representatives of the dali lama to resolve any concerns andifferences. >> the president hence -- hinted at chinese irritation. >> i stressed to president obama that under the current system, our country's need to oppose and reject protectionism. >> mr. obama headed to the forbidden city. the crowds were kept away. signs
challengesacing america's future. and adtional funding is provided by the following supporters- > hello and good evening. i'm ljit dhaliwal. imagine here in the united stes that they held vote to ban a wel-known religious symbol, the spe of a church, t's say, because some fel threatened by it. well, at has happened in switrland where voters have approved ban on the building of minarets,he towershat are a typical pa of mosques. the vote in a nationa referendum was57% for the ban, which was aimed at stopping further islamition in switzerland, in t words of the naonalist party that supported it. but the vote was widely criticized by islamic groups today. anfrance's foreign minter called it an expression of intolerance. tonight's "lead focus the controversl swiss move and analysis oit beginningith jane dodge of it >> reporter: tre are only four of them in switzerland, but that's four tooany acording to thecountry'slargest pay. and now it seems t swiss public agrees. in a result that surprisedmany, 57% of voteoted a ban on the building of minarets. the country's f right sss ople's party who are behin
to our viewers in pbs in america and also around the globe. coming up later for you -- and illegal raid under the cover of darkness. why heritage groups are trying to prevent fragments from the past from disappearing forever. and the giants indelicacy that fetched a mouthwatering some at an auction -- eight giant -- a gienat delicacy. hello. it has been a day of celebration and remembering, and the once divided city of berlin, and the heart of the once divided continent of europe. in its 28 years the berlin wall signified repression and fear but on this night in 1989 the first crossing point opened and berliners surged through, effectively marking the end of a communist empire. worrell leaders gathered in the pouring rain at the brandenburg gate to mark the moment. >> and new generation celebrating freedom and the end of the world order they never knew. the berlin wall to these children just something from the history books or recollections of their parents and grandparents. my find them, world leaders striding through the brandenburg gate, once the border between east and west berlin.
afghanistan into the context of what's happening in america today. not only a trillion-dollar national debt, we're in the worst recession since the great depression the middle class is collapsing. piece in the paper today, 1 out of 4 kids in this country are on food stamps. 1 out of 8 americans. when we buy our christmas products, we're buying china products. i have real problems of expanding this war. the u.s. doing is the work that the rest of the world is doing. i want to see some international cooperation, not just from europe, russia and china. what happens in afghanistan impacts what happens in pakistan. that's enormously important. >> you know the russians aren't going to go back into afghanistan. >> i have a real problem sporting 30,000 or 40,000 more troops and hundred billions a year more on top of what we're spending in iraq. >> senator graham? >> i would like to hear the details from the president on tuesday. i would support an increase in troops that bernie just indicated about pakistan. the iranians are threatening to withdraw from talks on their nuclear program. we'll be eval
by fox news channel] captioned by the national captioning institute ---www.ncicap.org--- hello, america, welcome to the program. i'm a little heavier. i want to talk to you a little bit about the health of our nation and everybody else is going to talk about healthcare. that's what they're talking about in washington. here is the only thing you need to know about healthcare today, real quick in a nutshell. $1 trillion is what they say this will cost, the cato institute just did this, this is the way it normally works. the government takes money from you, right? they tax you. then they take that money, and they spend it, and they say we're going to build a bridge, or they're going to give it to some corporation to build a bridge that they have chosen. right? tax and spend. healthcare, tax and spend, $1 trillion. well, cato has just found there is a new game being played and this is only going to cost you $1 trillion. the government, for the first time, ever, is going to mandate something new. the government is going to mandate that you spend your money at this corporation with these peop
and addressing key economic challenges cing america's future. and addition funding is provided by the llowing supporters -- >>> hello and good evening i'm ljit dhaliwal. and welcome to apecial edition of "worldfocus." for cades, it stood as the symbol of the cold war. built in 1961,he berlin wall wathe line in the sand where western mocracy ended and commist rul beg. then suddenly, 20 years ago today, it wasgone. today on the annersary of the fall of the berlin wal, world leaders gathered in berlin, led by german cncellor anla merkel. france's niolas car ozy, britain's gordon brown, russia's dmitry medvedev and u.s. secretarof state hillary clinton crossed the former border between east a west rlin underneath the htoric andenburg gate. ordinary germans also turned out by the thoughsands, placing flowers and candles the remembrae of the peop who perishedrying to crossthe divide. our german parer, the broadcter deutsche wle has our "lead focus" tonig, taking us back to the rapidly unfolding events of thatight 20 years ag >>eporter: even late in the afternoon of november 9th, the was indicatio
greenhouse gas emissions. and they hope his visit will remake america's image as the most skeptical and greenhouse gas emissions. it doesn't seem likely that treatly will emerge from copenhagen, but yesterday mr. obama said he did want a firm political agreement from copenhagen that would take the world towards the climate change treaty next year. >> with two weeks before the beginning of copenhagen, it is essential that all countries do what is necessary to reach a strong operational agreement that will confront the threat of climate change while serving as a stepping stone to a legally-binding treaty. >> the president will take with him a set of targets for cuts in greenhouse emissions, again, something the rest of the world has wanted for a long time. he will offer to cut emissions by 17% from 2005 levels by "20/20" and 83% by 2050. congress has not yet passed legislation which by make those cuts law in the united states. that is a battle still to be fought in washington. but the administration is clearly hoping that both domestic laws and an international treaty or attainable pe
to moderate the international market for the benefit of the reduces and consumers. america, the united states is one of our major trading partners. we supply an essential part of the oil in the united states. of course, a little oil also goes to europe, so half and half, europe and north america. and finally to other various trading arrangements. we believe that the current market situation is one that has to be handled with such a mind of delicacy because in the process of recovery and intel it's fully recovered, we will have to be careful how much oil we put in the market retries if we're not careful then it could try the prices very low, like they went as low as $30 a barrel at the height of the economic problems the world experienced over the past year or so. we are hopeful that the recovery of the national oil will continue. in which case, we will be able to reduce an export more. we have, i'm sure you have heard about the recent problems in nigeria, which resulted in serious demolition of our capacity to produce and damage to our oil infrastructure. but with the recent fortune and occur
of a hell bent energy to make themselves successful against the backdrop of segregation in america. and i think that they thought if they could fight their way into the headlines, adam clayton powell and church politics around america, u.s. congress, sammy davis jr., night clubs in the 1940's and 50's and than sugar ray robinson has a pure championship athlete. >> host: i think we are bad at teaching history in this country and oftentimes the civil rights movement is taught is as if it is spring forward from dr. king in the 50's as if there wasn't groundwork laid before that. and in all three men as well you see evidence of that ground work and the idea of we are going to challenge racism in ways that may be will inspire people and unintended consequences if you will, and about to take it to sugar ray robinson you have a brilliant chapter in the book about the experience in the u.s. army and comparing and contrasting his demeanor as i believe a corporal in the u.s. army with the experience of the sort of running buddy joe louis. can you speak a little bit about sugar ray robinson's experi
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